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NYC DEP Filing Requirements for Engines, Generators, and Turbines


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In compliance with environmental and safety standards, the NYC DEP has outlined specific requirements regarding the registration, work permits, and certificates to operate for various types of generators and engines. These guidelines are aimed at ensuring the proper functioning, emissions control, and safety of emergency and portable generators, engines, turbines, and combustion sources. Here's an overview of the applicability and filing requirements:


Registration Applicability:

Emergency and Portable Generators: Any generator with a capacity of 40 KW or greater falls under the registration requirement.

Emergency and Portable Engines: Engines with a power output of 50 HP or greater, but less than 600 HP, require registration unless they power self-propelled construction or landscape equipment.

Stationary Turbines or Combustion Sources: Turbines or combustion sources with an input of 350,000 Btu/hr or greater, but less than 4.2 million Btu/hr, necessitate registration.

Stationary Engines and Generators: Engines with an output of 50 HP or greater but less than 600 HP, and generators with a capacity of 40 kW or greater but less than 450 kW, must be registered.


Registration Filing Requirements:

  • Registration applications can be submitted by the owner, owner’s representative, or any licensed professional.

  • Required information includes equipment make/model, serial number, fuel type, maximum heat input/output, EPA tier, emission control details, and smoke test certification (unless exempted for newly installed Tier 4 certified engines).

  • Registration is valid for up to three years from the date of approval.

Work Permit/Certificate to Operate Applicability:

Stationary Engines: Engines with a power output of 600 HP or greater require a work permit.

Stationary Generators: Generators with a capacity of 450 kW or greater necessitate a work permit.

Stationary Turbines or Combustion Sources: Sources with an input of 4.2 million Btu/hr or greater also require a work permit.


Work Permit Filing Requirements:

  • A Professional Engineer (PE) or Registered Architect (RA) must certify the application.

  • Required information includes stack parameters, equipment details, fuel type, maximum heat input/output, EPA tier, emission estimates, and equipment layout plans.

  • Work permits are issued for one year from the date of approval.

Certificate to Operate (Inspection Request) Requirements:

  • After installation completion, a PE or RA must submit an inspection request.

  • Smoke test certification using EPA Method 9 or Method 5 must accompany the inspection request.

  • Certificates to operate are issued for up to three years from the date of inspection.

Notes

1. Engines and generators that are less than 40 kW (50 hp) are not required to file with the NYCDEP. 

2. Applicability is based on a per unit basis. Multiple units with the same make and model and fuel usage can be filed on a single Registration or Work Permit Application. 

3. Emergency generator means an internal combustion engine that operates as a mechanical or electrical power source only when the usual source of power is unavailable. (Generators that participate in demand response or peak shaving programs are not defined as emergency units.) 

4. Portable means designed and capable of being carried or moved from one location to another and not kept at one location or facility for more than twelve consecutive months


These regulatory measures aim to ensure compliance with environmental standards, emission controls, and safety protocols in the operation of generators, engines, turbines, and combustion sources. Adhering to these guidelines is crucial for mitigating environmental impact and ensuring public safety.


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